Names

My given name is gendered, but it sounds very close to a unisex name. Think “Tyler” and “Taylor” kind of thing. It’s close enough that when I introduce myself people sometimes mishear the gender-neutral name. And I’ve… stopped correcting them.

I like the gender-neutral name. It’s always been my default online pseudonym on sites that need a “real” name. And I like how I feel when I hear people call me by that name.

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Pride at Work

I work at a public library. We’ve had Pride Month book displays up in the Young Adult area and the Children’s Room all month but nothing in the main adult section.

We had one last year, with a flag and everything, and we got a couple really nasty comments about it.

I’ve spent the past two weeks wanting to put up another one. I made lists of books to pull for it, I planned out how I would set it up, but I didn’t want to ask if I could (I am not out at work). I kept hoping someone would take the initiative and then I could quietly add more books to it, like I did to the YA display.

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Reading for Pride

I’ve decided to only read LGBTQ books – preferably own voices LGBTQ books – in June, as a way to do something personal to acknowledge Pride Month, since I have far too much anxiety to go to parades or events.

I read a fair number of LGBTQ books already; just about 65% of what I’ve read so far this year has had some degree of queer representation. For this month, though, it’s going to be 100%.

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U.S. Pride Jerseys

The U.S. men’s and women’s national teams will use rainbow numbers on their jerseys in June for Pride month. Rainbow number jerseys are also available for fans to buy, with a portion of the proceeds going to the You Can Play project.

I was so excited to see that announcement. As a queer fan, soccer stadiums don’t always feel welcoming to me. What a great gesture by U.S. Soccer to show that maybe people like me are welcome after all.

And then I read the comments.

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Singular They

Who doesn’t use the singular they? Sentences like “Someone forgot their hat” are so common in everyday usage and (crazy prescriptivists aside) no one thinks twice about it. But many people who have no problem with the above sentence object to people who use they-them-theirs pronouns. What’s the difference?

The AP has added the singular they to its style guide.

My mother said “The decline of civilization is reflected by the destruction of language.”

What a shock that I’m still closeted.